PROJECTS AND COLLABORATIONS         

 
 

The Ciné-Concert Project seeks to bring contemporary sound into the rich world of classic silent films.  Here, the atmosphere and haunting images of the “film noire” era meet contemporary music techniques and electronic sounds bridging over a century of musical development.  The original piano accompaniment is now replaced by a rich music score played live, giving the film a new and exciting dimension.  Boundaries are pushed, sounds explored, scenes “extremed” by non-compromising perpetual sound accompaniment, giving the viewer the multiple sensation of film audience as a concert goer. The rich orchestral palette is created by two performer/composers collecting sounds through acoustic and electronic mediums, standard as well as exotic, invented and synthesized. This gives the listener a continuously simulating live music score in the making.  Hence, the classic film is now transformed into a multi-sensual universe. The Ciné-Concert Project was founded by Stephen Horenstein and Lior Navok, with production by the Jerusalem Institute of Contemporary Music. The repertoire listed below was created from 2010 to 2017.

THE LODGER (1927) Alfred Hitchcock

Horenstein - Navok Duo
Stephen Horenstein:
Woodwinds, Percussion, Electronics
Lior Navok: Piano, Keyboards

’’The date of the film: 1927. The Lodger is considered Hitchcock’s first true artistic statement…his way of thinking (and seeing) is all there, even at this early stage! It is his primary silent film…soon after, talkies were produced, including his own groundbreaking movies. Working on this spectacular film has been both a privilege and challenge.’ S. Horenstein/ L. Navok

“The Lodger introduced themes that would run through much of Hitchcock’s later work: the innocent man on the run, hunted down by a self-righteous society, and a fetishistic sexuality. Hitchcock had clearly been watching contemporary films by Murnau and Lang, whose influence can be seen in the ominous camera angles and claustrophobic lighting. While Hitchcock had made two previous films, in later years the director would refer to The Lodger as the first true “Hitchcock film”. Beginning with The Lodger, Hitchcock helped shape the modern-day thriller genre in film.” (from Wikipedia)

DR. JEKYLL AND MR. HYDE (1920) John S. Robertson

THE BUTTERFLY EFFECT ENSEMBLE 
Stephen Horenstein: Woodwinds, Percussion, Electronics
Jeffery Kowalsky: Percussion
Lior Navok: Piano, Keyboards

Scientist Dr. Henry Jekyll (John Barrymore) is intelligent and diligent, but also uptight and extremely serious about his work. When his friend, Sir George Carew (Brandon Hurst), takes him to a show featuring the sensual Miss Gina (Nita Naldi), an aroused Jekyll sets out on a quest to separate man's saintly and sinful sides. His experiments succeed, and his evil alter ego, Mr. Hyde, is created. As the doctor uncontrollably alternates between Jekyll and Hyde, danger looms. (From IMDb)

THE GOLEM (1920) Paul Wegener

THE BUTTERFLY EFFECT ENSEMBLE 
Stephen Horenstein: Woodwinds, Percussion, Electronics
Jeffery Kowalsky: Percussion
Lior Navok: Piano, Keyboards

In 16th century Prague, Rabbi Loew (Albert Steinruck) interprets an alignment of stars as a sign that disaster is about to befall the city's Jews. The following day, Emperor Luhois (Otto Gebühr) bans Loew's people from Prague, prompting the rabbi to build a statue, known as the Golem (Paul Wegener), that he hopes to animate as a savior. Brought to life by an evil spirit, Astaroth, the creature is, at first, gentle and compassionate. That, however, quickly changes as the creature goes insane. (From IMDb)